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Fuelling controversy

THIS is apropos your editorial ‘Fuelling controversy’ (Jan 20). It is only natural that the finance minister should feel that the petrol crisis is owing to a conspiracy against the government.
This is always the reaction of those who are incompetent and inefficient. The problem with the PML-N is that its leader cannot trust anyone who is not closely related to him. He is not comfortable with those who do not belong to his hometown or those who speak a different dialect from his own.

Consequently, he has appointed only close relatives and cronies to positions of power, who think they can never be held accountable for negligence. It is surprising that it took so long for a major crisis like this one to erupt.

In any other country, such inefficiency and carelessness would have resulted in the immediate resignation of the minister concerned (if not the government itself).

Shakir Lakhani
Karachi
Printed in DAWN, January 25, 2015

Lawyers’ strike

Sir: I salute the country’s lawyers for observing a strike against the publication of offensive cartoons by a French periodical. Everyone knows that it is due to such strikes that our judiciary has been strengthened and disposing of civil suits is being done so speedily. I request that people belonging to other professions should also follow these lawyers for bringing positive change in society.

Shakir Lakhani
Karachi
Printed in Daily Times, January 20, 2015



Useless elections

Sir: After the passage of the 21st Constitutional Amendment allowing the establishment of military courts, I won’t be surprised if people soon start clamouring for increase in the powers of the judiciary. The masses want accountability of those who are responsible for the mess we are in today. Why should only terrorists be tried by military courts? Why not try those who did nothing to curb terrorism but looted public money and sent it to their foreign bank accounts? The two successive governments since 2008 did nothing to improve security, nor did they take any steps to prevent malnourishment among the poor. Almost all federal and provincial ministers during the past seven years were concerned only with enriching themselves. Now that parliament has surrendered to the military, what excuse does it have for existence? It is a fragile democracy. Why is our taxes money being spent on helping ministers to maintain their lavish lifestyles? In my opinion, another amendment to the constitution may soon be needed: doing away with elections and assemblies and allowing the armed forces to run the country.

Shakir Lakhani
Karachi
Printed in Daily Times, January 8, 2015









THIS refers to the news item ‘Multi-billion- rupee mangrove forest land grab: the sequel’ (Dec 28). The proposed military courts should begin by trying criminals involved. During the early years of Ayub Khan’s martial law smugglers faced the death penalty and many civilians were given long-term imprisonment and were whipped, sometimes for traffic violations also.

S.L.
Karachi
Printed in DAWN, January 7, 2015








Security threat

With reference to your editorial “Security threat” (December 22). Sometimes it seems that we can never win the war against terrorists when we hear that the Sindh Chief Minister wants to buy another helicopter worth Rs. 1.6 billion for his personal use. Or when we see six police vehicles standing outside the houses of provincial ministers in Karachi’s DHA; and when we see police mobile vans with women and children shopping in Sunday Bazaar. If our leaders believe that the entire security budget should be spent only on protecting themselves and not the ordinary people, we may as well hand the country over to the Taliban.

Shakir Lakhani
Karachi
Printed in DAWN, January 2, 2015

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